google-site-verification: google61fb499fca0f9f6f.html A Podcast From Beneath
A Podcast From Beneath
Shallow Grave Plot 7

Shallow Grave Plot 7

January 13, 2021

In our first episode of 2021, Carey and Aaron talk about what's coming up in the new year.

Friday the 13th the last one, until part 3.

Friday the 13th the last one, until part 3.

December 23, 2020

Its a continuation of our Friday the 13th deep dive

Friday the 13th 1-4 Round Table

Friday the 13th 1-4 Round Table

December 9, 2020

Carey is joined by Erik, and Megan to do a deep dive into the first 4 films in the Friday the 13th franchise.

Night of the Living Dead

Night of the Living Dead

December 2, 2020

On this weeks episode, Aaron, Carey, and William get together to talk about George Romero's Night of the Living Dead, and they also touch on the other films in the Dead series.

Scare Me

Scare Me

November 25, 2020

This week on A Podcast From Beneath, the guys talk about the 2020 film Scare Me. Mr Poe picks up Midnight Devils from Wal-Mart, and as always they get off track but have fun doing it. 

Cannibal Holocaust

Cannibal Holocaust

November 11, 2020

This week on A Podcast From Beneath, the guys are joined by Erik Kristopher Myers, and Megan Morgan to talk about the cult classic, Cannibal Holocaust.

You can find Erik's movies on Amazon

Roulette

Butterfly Kisses

Megan's Books can found with the links below

The Altered Wake

Megan's Podcast can be found here

Cocktails and Cookbooks

Hammer Halloween Round Table

Hammer Halloween Round Table

October 31, 2020

This week we get together again with Erik Kristopher Myers, and William Hopkins to talk about Hammer Horror films.

 

Here is a right up with some links provided by William Hopkins.

 

Best of Hammer Horror and related films...
 
Despite their lavish look and many positive qualities, Hammer's horror films were made as "programmers" – quickly and cheaply made entertainment product that was almost always released as part of a double bill. So the films should be viewed and judged in that light.  

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957): The first in Hammer's Frankenstein series. An enormously successful (and controversial) film in its day – and it still holds up very well even now. You can buy or rent the film on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/FCNrxjaVf2M

The Horror of Dracula (1958): The first in Hammer's Dracula series. Inventive script by Jimmy Sangster; clever direction by Hammer's best director, Terence Fisher; beautiful cinematography, sets, costumes. And a rousing, memorable climax that Hammer never topped. One of the top five Dracula adaptations. Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/atQr_Eac11k

The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958): The second in Hammer's Frankenstein series. A smart, well-crafted follow-up to the first film. Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/IkXx3MeZNvU

Brides of Dracula (1960): The second in Hammer's Dracula series. A lavish, colorful, fast-paced gothic melodrama that doesn't suffer at all from the absence of Dracula himself. A favorite of mine; I think it's one of Hammer's best. Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/NEQHTxU63ls

The Evil of Frankenstein: (1964): The first of the Hammer Frankenstein films to be produced in cooperation with Universal (who made the original Frankenstein in 1931). With an infusion of cash from Universal, this is one of most visually impressive of Hammer's Frankenstein films, with great sets that recall the Universal original. But the monster is one of the weakest of the Hammer series and the script is not up to par. Not one of Hammer's best but still enjoyable. Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/cTyJWBF22zA

Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966): Christopher Lee returns to the role of Dracula - though he has no lines and is only briefly onscreen - in the third film in Hammer's series. Very well produced, and for once a genuinely suspenseful and even scary Dracula film. 

Frankenstein Created Woman (1967): An off-beat entry in Hammer's Frankenstein series. Not the best of the series, but surprisingly well-done and enjoyable. 

   

Dracula Has Risen From the Grave (1968): Fourth in the Hammer Dracula series, with Christopher Lee returning in the role of the Count. Entertaining, smart, fast-paced. Lee is only on screen briefly and has little dialog, but his snarling, red-eyed, demonic appearance in this film (and it's follow-up) are probably the reason he came to be thought of, by a generation of film fans, as the ultimate screen Dracula. Apparently, at the time this was Hammer's highest grossing film.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/s9gGa4t4sHc

Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970): Christopher Lee had determined not to play Dracula again, so Hammer cast Ralph Bates as his replacement for this film. (Also in 1970, Bates briefly replaced Peter Cushing in Hammer's Frankenstein series.) But at the last minute Hammer managed to change Lee's mind, so here he is again - with Bates shifted over to the role of Dracula's would-be acolyte. Beautifully shot, fun, solid Hammer entertainment, though not the best of the Dracula films. One of two (!) Dracula films Hammer released in 1970.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/VjoPIXZW09Q

Scars of Dracula (1970): Christopher Lee is back again in one of the weaker entries in the Dracula series. Handsomely produced and not devoid of entertainment value, but it often feels tired and tedious, with occasional bursts of unnecessarily brutal violence. Lee, though, has more screen time and dialog in this entry than any of the other Dracula films he did for Hammer. After this one, Warner Brothers, which was financing and distributing Hammer's films in the US, insisted they bring the Dracula character into the modern world, so this is the last "period piece" Hammer Dracula film in which Lee played the Count.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ZMbH-KyHsXs

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1970): One of the best of the Hammer Frankenstein series. Fast-paced, beautifully shot and performed, with a smart, inventive script. A favorite of mine.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/cI-fG0Ov2Pc

The Horror of Frankenstein (1970): Widely viewed as a misstep when it was released, this is Hammer's attempt at a parody of their own films. (Possibly, a reaction to the popularity of Andy Warhol's Frankenstein and Roman Polanski's Fearless Vampire Killers, which were both open and unabashed homage/parodies of the Hammer films.)  I think Ralph Bates is a worthy stand-in for Peter Cushing and I think the film is smart and funny,  though it clearly is not the best of the Hammer Frankensteins. Incidentally, that's David Prowse as the monster. He would go on to play Darth Vadar in Star Wars. He's wearing a significantly skimpier costume here.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/yU_D11OlNSs

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972): First of two Hammer Dracula films set in the 1970s. This is the film Marvel comics appears to be imitating with its Tombs of Dracula books. The first fifteen minutes of the film, which appear to be more inspired by A Clockwork Orange than anything else, are idiotic and annoying, but the film as a whole is an example of the kind of colorful, dynamic genre storytelling that Hammer excelled at. (Even at this late stage.) Peter Cushing gives a master class in the use of cigarettes and other props in screen acting. Sexy, beautiful, Caroline Munro also makes an appearance here. She would go on to appear in Hammer's Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter, as well as the Bond film, The Spy Who Loved Me, and Ray Harryhausen's Sinbad film, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad. Dracula A.D. 1972 is apparently a favorite of Tim Burton. The musical score, which was derided as being wildly inappropriate for a Dracula film when the film was first released, has now developed a cult following, as has the film itself.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/AUu7bUIUGNU

The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1974): The last appearance of Christopher Lee as Dracula in a Hammer film. And the last time Lee would play Dracula to Cushing's Van Helsing. (Cushing would go on to play Van Helsing in one more Hammer Dracula film, Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires.) This film's story follows directly from the story of the previous film, which is unusual for Hammer. (They usually didn't stress perfect continuity in their Dracula or Frankenstein series. ) I think I prefer this one to Dracula A.D. 1972, but both are fun, colorful and reasonably fast-paced, though the stories in both films are illogical and border on the silly. One aspect of The Satanic Rites of Dracula inspired a key plot point in my film, Sleepless Nights. Joanna Lumley, who would go on to achieve fame in the popular Brit comedy show, Absolutely Fabulous, plays Van Helsing's daughter here.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/J2H1ZO0gups

Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell (1974): A return to form for the final entry in the Hammer Frankenstein series. After the commercial and critical failure of the series' attempted reboot, Horror of Frankenstein, Ralph Bates is out and Peter Cushing is back as Baron Frankenstein. This is a smart, well-crafted finale for the series, though it's an unusually grim and bleak film for the series, and the monster (once again played by David Prowse) is one of the more absurd iterations of the monster.

Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/_Lb4nFlf2Rw

The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974): The last of the Hammer Dracula series, with Peter Cushing back for a final turn as Van Helsing. This unusual mash-up of two exploitation film genres (decades before From Dusk Till Dawn) was the result of a co-producing deal between Hammer and Sir Run Run Shaw, the legendary Hong Kong film producer. Surprisingly well-done and entertaining, especially if you're a kung fu film fan. The appearance of John Forbes-Robinson as Dracula at the film's climax is its most disappointing moment. Heavily made up and speaking in a ridiculously ominous voice, he looks less like Christopher Lee's Dracula and more like someone made up for Halloween trick-or-treating. The film struggled to find distribution in the US, as was the case with Satanic Rites of Dracula. Both were eventually re-cut, retitled and dumped on the market by "Dynamite Films," an exploitation film distributor. After Dynamite Films went out of business, both Satanic Rites and 7 Golden Vampires entered into the public domain, a status they have been rescued from by Warner, which has asserted its copyright and recently released Blu-ray editions of the films. Years later, Sir Run Run Shaw would also co-produce Blade Runner. Hammer would make just two more films after Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires: To the Devil, A Daughter, with Christopher Lee and Richard Widmark, and a remake of Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes, with Elliot Gould and Cybil Shepard. Watch FOR FREE on YouTube: https://youtu.be/eA_L4L0qrAs

Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter (1974): This quirky, off-beat Hammer vampire film was directed by Brian Clemens, who wrote and produced The Avengers, for British TV. (He's responsible for casting Diana Rigg as Mrs. Peel.) The film shows the influence of the Sergio Leone spaghetti western films and may itself have served as an influence on Marvel's comic and film series character, Blade. Interesting and memorable.  Watch FOR FREE on Hammer's Official YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/RsWAVsRefSg

Quatermass & the Pit (1967): One of Hammer's best, based on Nigel Kneale's groundbreaking British TV serial. Science fiction with supernatural horror overtones. Loaded with great ideas. Echoes of this film can be seen in The X-Files among other TV series and films. Well performed and shot.  A favorite of mine. 

The Mummy (1959): While Hammer's first two big hits, Curse of Frankenstein and Horror of Dracula, were ostensibly adaptations of novels in the public domain and not sequels or remakes of Universal's classic horror films from the 30s, the studio's great success led to collaborations with Universal, such as Evil of Frankenstein, and licensing arrangements that allowed them to remake Universal's copyrighted material. Universal's 1932 film, The Mummy, was not based on a novel in the public domain, it was an original screenplay that led to a franchise that has so far resulted in ten movies from 1932 to 2017, so Universal unquestionably owned the copyright to the story and characters, and when Hammer decided to add The Mummy to their roster of monsters, they needed a licensing arrangement with Universal. They got one, which allowed them to use characters and plot points not just from Universal's first Mummy film, but from several of its sequels. In return Universal got the distribution rights to the film, which was so successful in its original release that Hammer ended up cranking out three sequels, the last one hitting the screens in 1971.

I have to admit that while I revere the 1932 Universal original, I was never a fan of any of the Universal Mummy sequels, which I considered tedious, and so the 1959 production of The Mummy was one Hammer film I avoided, never seeing it as a child, teenager or young adult. In fact, I only saw it for the first time about two years ago. I sought it out, finally, because I had begun to develop a special appreciation for the work of director Terence Fisher. I'm glad I did, because it's definitely in the front rank of Hammer films. It has the lavish, richly colorful look that was by then a hallmark of Hammer productions; it's smart, well-paced, tightly scripted and has a surprisingly nuanced performance, by Christopher Lee, of the title character. In his portrayal of the creature in Curse of Frankenstein and the Count in Horror of Dracula, Lee showed that even when he had little or no dialog, he could bring a degree of depth to monster characters through physicality alone, and he does the same here. He's very much the rampaging monster at times, but his eyes and his body language create an impression of a mummy that has thoughts, emotions and dimensions to its personality that aren't even hinted at in the Universal sequels or in Hammer's own sequels. (In two of Hammer's Mummy movies, the mummy's face is hidden behind bandages, so no emoting is necessary.)

Buy or rent The Mummy (1959) on YouTube: https://youtu.be/uojNB-SbDEo

The Devil Rides Out (1968): This may be my favorite Hammer film. It's another Terence Fisher film, and another with Christopher Lee in the lead. It's based on a terrible novel by a terrible writer, Dennis Wheatley, but the screenwriter, Richard Matheson (of I Am Legend, Duel, Hell House and Twilight Zone fame) does a terrific job of finding all that is exciting, suspenseful and entertaining in the novel, while weeding out most of the dumb, racist, reactionary stuff Wheatley was famous for. (While he's almost entirely forgotten today, and his books are largely out of print, he was, for a time, one of the best selling authors in the English language.)

Some of the story ideas in The Devil Rides Out made their way into my story for Demon Resurrection. My villain, Toth, is essentially Mocata, the villainous cult leader played with such elan by the great Charles Gray. In fact, Demon Resurrection could be seen as one half The Devil Rides Out, and one half Night of the Living Dead.

For once, Lee has an enormous amount of dialog, and he delivers it with speed and style, punctuating each line with flourishes of his hands and eyebrows. One could say this is "hand and eyebrow acting" at its most entertaining. The rest of the cast is equally good, with Grey giving the screen one of its most urbane villains. (He would later bring his wit and style to the role of Blofeld in the Bond film, Diamonds are Forever.)

The film was not a big hit for Hammer when it came out. 1968 was the year of Rosemary's Baby and perhaps critics and audiences found The Devil Rides Out a bit too old-fashioned. But I love it, for all its absurdities and melodramatic excesses.

The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959): The same year Hammer's first Mummy movie came out, Hammer released its one and only Sherlock Holmes adaptation. Seeking to capitalize on their newfound fame as purveyors of horror product, they naturally turned to the Holmes adventure that had the most pronounced supernatural overtones, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Their biggest star, Peter Cushing was a natural choice to play Holmes, and he does so with great wit, style and energy. (He would go on to play Holmes in a BBC series in 1965.) Their other biggest star, Christopher Lee got a lesser role in the film, not as Watson but instead as Sir Henry Baskerville, the film's romantic lead. (He'd go on to play Holmes in a 1962 German film, with Terence Fisher directing, and in two leaden American TV movies in the early 90s.)

I've always thought of the Universal 1939 version of this story, with Basil Rathbone, as the definitive film version, but I've always enjoyed this one as well. Cushing is in the upper tier of actors who have played the character, and the film itself, like most of the best Hammer films, is colorful, fast moving and stylish.
Buy or rent on YouTube: https://youtu.be/wMwMGhZBAJU

The Lost Continent (1968): The same year Hammer released The Devil Rides Out, it also released this film adaptation of another Dennis Wheatley novel. This one is more adventure than horror, and it has what must be the wackiest plot of any Hammer film, involving the crew and passengers of a tramp steamer loaded with explosive cargo, getting lost in the Sargasso Sea and discovering a secret civilization made up of pirates and the descendents of Spanish Conquistadors. Oh, and there's giant lobsters and killer seaweed to deal with as well. It's a blast.

There are several more interesting and entertaining Hammer films that are worth catching, but if you see only those I've mentioned in this email, you'll have a pretty good overview of the company's output. For what it's worth, my favorites are:

1.) The Devil Rides Out
2.) Quatermass and the Pit
3.) Brides of Dracula
4.) Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
5.) Horror of Dracula
6.) Curse of Frankenstein

Lee and Cushing also appeared in a number of films for Hammer's chief competitor during the 50s, 60s & 70s: Amicus Films. Amicus is probably best known for producing the first film adaptations of the EC horror comics, Tales from the Crypt and The Vault of Horror. Their specialty was the portmanteau or anthology film – collections of several short horror stories, often by writers like Robert Bloch, with a wrap-around story holding it all together. Their EC adaptations are great fun (and were big hits in their day) and the company turned out a number of other entertaining productions including three Edgar Rice Burroughs adaptations in the 70s, The Land that Time Forgot, The People That Time Forgot and At the Earth's Core. One has to have a pretty high tolerance for men in rubber dinosaur suits to enjoy these films, but I have fond memories of them from seeing them in local theaters when they were first released. (Hammer also made a couple of dinosaur films, one of which, One Million Years, BC, was among their biggest hits in the 1960s, and made a star of Raquel Welch. The dinosaurs in that film, however, are the work of the great Ray Harryhausen, so they're of a higher order of quality than the Amicus efforts, which are perhaps superior to the Japanese monster films, but probably look pretty silly to modern, post-Jurassic Park audiences.)

If, after sampling Hammer's offerings, you'd like to venture into Amicus territory, let me know and I'll send you a list of links to their best films. For now though, I'll just leave you with one Amicus title, their first film, produced before they'd even settled on their company name:

Horror Hotel, aka The City of the Dead (1960), is a wonderfully atmospheric and effective tale of witches and occultism starring Christopher Lee. It's well worth checking out. It can be viewed FREE on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/W7As-qun8MI

 
And finally, there's Horror Express (1972), one of the great pairings of Hammer stars Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing, but ironically not a Hammer film. It's a beautifully produced science-fiction/horror piece that gives us an idea of what Murder on the Orient Express might've been like if it had been written by Lovecraft. I saw this in the theater when it first came out and it's been a favorite of mine ever since, although I've had to settle for grainy washed-out prints in recent years. (Such is the fate of many films that fall into the public domain.) Fortunately a beautiful, fully-restored HD version has recently been released and it can be watched for free on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/4LCtzLEebBI

- William Hopkins 

Hammer's Frankenstein films on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein_(Hammer_film_series)
Verotika (the worst movie we have ever seen)

Verotika (the worst movie we have ever seen)

October 28, 2020

This week the guys talk about Glen Danzig's Verotika

6:45 Cast and Crew

6:45 Cast and Crew

October 21, 2020

This week Carey, and Mr. Poe sat down with the cast and crew of the upcoming film 6:45.

 

In this heart-racing psychological thriller, we are introduced to Bobby Patterson who is taking one last romantic shot at saving his rocky relationship with his girlfriend Jules Rables on a weekend getaway.

 

The couple arrives for vacation in the quiet island resort called "Bog Grove." To their bewilderment, the sleepy beach town is curiously deserted and they quickly learn about its deadly history that's about to repeat itself.

 

Bobby’s struggles with Jules are cast aside in order to overcome a dementing cycle of terror that transpires. No matter what he does to try to avoid it, he and his girlfriend wake up at 6:45 each morning to the same nightmarish chain of events that lead to them being viciously murdered with no chance of escape.

 

Official Page 

Instagram

Facebook 

Trailer

The Omen Round Table

The Omen Round Table

October 14, 2020

This week Carey and Aaron are joined once again by William Hopkins, and Erik K. Myers to talk about The Omen.

A few notes from William

A few corrections and clarifications of some statements made during the podcast...

 

• At around 00:07:49, I repeat something David Seltzer said in a 2014 interview that turns out to be wrong. Seltzer says he was inspired by the success of the novelization of the film JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SEAGULL to write the novelization of his screenplay for THE OMEN. 

 

But JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SEAGULL was not based on a screenplay. The book, written by Richard Bach and published in 1970, was a collection of shorter pieces Bach had previously published. The book was adapted into the screenplay for the film, which was released in 1973.

 

The book Seltzer is thinking of is Erich Segal's LOVE STORY, and it's probably because of the last name of the LOVE STORY author that Seltzer confused the two books.

 

Segal, who also contributed to the script for the Beatles' animated film, YELLOW SUBMARINE, turned his LOVE STORY screenplay into a novel that became a bestseller in 1970. The film was #1 at the box office when it was released to theaters in 1971.

 

---------

 

• At around 00:25:04, we discuss Oscar nominations for Jerry Goldsmith's music for THE OMEN. Here are the facts: In 1977, Goldsmith's AVE SATANI received an Academy Award nomination in the BEST SONG category, and his score for THE OMEN won the Oscar for BEST MUSIC: ORIGINAL SCORE.

 

I've been unable to find evidence of any "dancing nun" performance of AVE SATANI at the 1977 Oscar presentation. 

 

-----------

 

• At around 00:11:49, I mistakenly declare the great British director Mike Hodges dead. He is not. 

 

-----------

 

• At around 00:28:58, there is a question about whether OMEN II actor, Robert Foxworth, is still alive. He is.

 

Relatively recently, he supplied the voice of "Ratchet" in the TRANSFORMERS movies.

 

His hairdo is no longer as easily mocked. 

 

-----------

 

• At around 00:53:08, I have trouble remembering the name of the actor who played Jennings, the photographer, in the 2006 remake of THE OMEN. The actor's name is David Thewlis. 

 

-------------

 

• At around 00:56:27 I suggest that budgets for Hammer Films in the 70s were in the million dollar range. Actually their budgets were considerably less. Hammer's next-to-last horror film production, TO THE DEVIL, A DAUGHTER, had a budget of £360,000.

 

--------------

 

• At around 01:06:41, while discussing the abysmal sequel, OMEN IV: THE AWAKENING, I state that no one other than actor Michael Woods is holding an umbrella during the closing funeral scene, which is supposed to be taking place in the rain. Actually, there are a number of other mourners holding umbrellas, which are wet, but there's no falling rain visible. 

 

--------------

 

• At 01:16:52, I erroneously state that Hitchcock had a giant brandy snifter built for a shot in one of his films, so that the snifter and an actor in the distance would both be in sharp focus. This is wrong. The scene I was thinking of is in SPELLBOUND (1945) and the object Hitchcock had built was a giant fake hand holding a gun, not a brandy snifter. 

 

If anyone knows of any Hitchcock film that featured a giant brandy snifter, I would be obliged if you'd pass that information along to me :)

 

-------------

 

• At 01:18:38, there's a question about how Hitchcock filmed the shot, in PSYCHO, of Arbogast falling backwards down the flight of stairs leading up to Mrs. Bates' room. Here's how it was done: Hitchcock shot a background plate of a descent down the staircase and then had the actor, Martin Balsam, sit in a gimbal chair in front of a rear-projection screen, lean back and flail his arms as if tumbling backwards.

 

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Universal Monsters

Universal Monsters

October 7, 2020

This week Carey and Aaron are joined but writer and director of "Unlisted Owner" to talk about The Universal Monsters.

You can get a copy of Unlisted Owner here

 

Patreon Supporters 

Mad Hatters Boards

Sleepaway Camp

Sleepaway Camp

September 30, 2020

This week the guys get together with Director Erik Kristopher Myers to talk about that 80's classic Sleepaway Camp

 

Butterfly Kisses on Prime

Roulette on Prime

our store

Cauterized

Cauterized

September 23, 2020
Shallow Grave Plot 6

Shallow Grave Plot 6

September 16, 2020

This week on a special Shallow Grave Billy, and Carey are joined by special guest host Noellie Burger to talk all things horror and give you some great Indiegogo campaigns that you can support.

Indie Horror Family

 

Scarlett feature film (34 days left)
Christmas Slasher Film - Official Group

.

(47 days left)
Hearts of Darkness: The Making Of The Final Friday

(In Demand)

LAUNCHING SOON
Blood Beast - 2020 Horror Film
Launces November
 
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

September 9, 2020

This week Carey and Aaron are joined by Billy Pon and Stephanie Escmilla to discuss The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

 

Circus of the Dead

Skin Deep FX

Climax

Climax

September 2, 2020

This week the guys discuss 2018's Climax, stick around after the closing song for an extra treat.

Don't forget you can get A podcast From Beneath T-shirt in our store.

https://www.teepublic.com/user/apodcastfrombeneath

Squirm

Squirm

August 26, 2020

This week the guys have a blast talking about Squirm.

The Toxic Avenger

The Toxic Avenger

August 19, 2020

This week Carey and Mr Poe talk about The Toxic Avenger.

Evils of the Night

Evils of the Night

August 5, 2020

This week the guys enjoy a little film called Evils of the Night.

David Black

David Black

July 29, 2020

This week Carey, and Mr. Poe sat down and talked to writer/director/producer David Black. David is working on a "filmed during lock down" film, titled Toxic Alien Zombie Babes From Outer Space.

 

Toxic Alien Zombie Babes From Outer Space is a crazy, off the wall sci-fi/ horror movie that is being produced during the pandemic lock downs. It pays homage to many of the B grade movies of yesteryear that are seen as cult classics today.

 

Toxic Alien Facebook page

 

David's Youtube

They Live

They Live

July 22, 2020

This week Carey and Aaron disscus They Live, and also some cartoons, music, and Tales from Tubi, and the Weekly World News are back.

 

Our Tee Public Store

 

Reunion From Hell IndieGoGo

 

 

Deborah Voorhees

Deborah Voorhees

July 15, 2020

This week the guys sat down and talk to Deborah Voorhees, star of Friday the 13th 5, and writer/director of the upcoming 13 Fanboy it is currently on Indiegogo link below so you can chip in. 

 

Official Facebook group

Indiegogo

Shallow Grave Plot 5

Shallow Grave Plot 5

July 8, 2020

Its another shallow grave episode, the guys get caught up on The Watchmen, Childs Play and more 

The Exorcist Round Table

The Exorcist Round Table

July 1, 2020

On this weeks show the guys are joined by Directors William Hopkins, and Erik Myers for a fun and informative discussion in the Exorcist franchise, minus part 2.

 

Demon Resurrection

Butterfly Kisses

Mark Cantu(Massacre Academy)

Mark Cantu(Massacre Academy)

June 24, 2020

This week Carey and Aaron talk with the writer and director of the upcoming Massacre Academy.

 

Massacre Academy Facebook

 

David Howard Thornton

David Howard Thornton

June 17, 2020

This week the guys(even Billy) had an excellent and funny talk with Art the Clown himself David Howard Thornton, they talk about everything from Davids start in Church theater, Terrifier, and dream projects.

 

Davids Cameo Link

Ash Hamilton (The True Tale of Ole Splitfoot vs the Lesbian Warrior Nuns of the Great White North)

Ash Hamilton (The True Tale of Ole Splitfoot vs the Lesbian Warrior Nuns of the Great White North)

June 10, 2020

This week we had a blast talking with Ash Hamilton writer and Producer of the beautifully titled "The True Tale of Ole Splitfoot vs the Lesbian Warrior Nuns of the Great White North". After you listen hop on over to the films Indiegogo and toss some hard earned money their way, and make sure to visit Ash's web sit Horror-Fix.

 

Indiegogo

Horror-fix

The Zombie Game

The Zombie Game

June 3, 2020

This week Carey and Mr Poe had a talk with Dan Bridge, and Emily McGuiness. We talked about Horror movies, comics and their upcoming graphic novel The Zombie Game. Emily has a book titled Dead Stinking Animals, and Dan has a web series The Fall Dude, links are listed below.

 

https://www.instagram.com/thezombiegame/ 

https://www.thefalldude.com/

https://bit.ly/deadstinkyanimals

 

Jordan Elizabeth Gelber

Jordan Elizabeth Gelber

May 27, 2020

This week we had a so much fun talking with Jordan Elizabeth Gelber, Jordan has been on the TV shows "The Americans", and "House of Cards" she also wrote and directed a short film titled "Legit". Jordan has also created a network featuring some really great shows.

Starbaby Network

Insta

Erik Kristopher Myers(Butterfly KIsses)

Erik Kristopher Myers(Butterfly KIsses)

May 20, 2020

This week we had a great conversation with Erik Kristopher Myers, we talked about his favorite horror films, his career and his film Butterfly Kisses. 

 

Amazon link

Ain't It Cool

 

 

Shallow Grave Plot 4

Shallow Grave Plot 4

May 13, 2020

We talk about everything from the new Star Wars game, Hellraiser TV show, and Carey still hates all of the different streaming services I introduce the guys to Neil Breen and you can watch the clip we watch during the show here Faithful Findings zoom didnt record the audio while we were watching it.

The Exorcist III

The Exorcist III

May 6, 2020

This week the guys sat around and talked about The Exorcist III

Dog Soldiers

Dog Soldiers

April 29, 2020

This week the guys talk about Dog Soldiers 

6-6-6 List our favorite Vampire films

6-6-6 List our favorite Vampire films

April 22, 2020

This week we talk about our favorite Vampire films

Vida Ghaffari

Vida Ghaffari

April 15, 2020

This week Carey and Mr Poe had the chance to talk with actress Vida Ghaffari. Vida talked about her career and her new films Eternal Code, and her upcoming film Realm of Shadows

Vida's links: 

Facebook

Twitter

IMDB

Instagram

Facebook Page: So Very Vida

Freddy VS Jason: Dreamscape

Freddy VS Jason: Dreamscape

April 8, 2020

This week Carey, and Mr Poe talked to Blake Best, Cody Huskins, and Joshua Adams about their upcoming fan film Freddy VS Jason: Dreamscape 

 

Indiegogo

 

 

Shallow Grave Plot 3

Shallow Grave Plot 3

April 1, 2020

it another shallow grave episode, we give you our list for movies to have in a quarantine. 

Live Form the Morgue(COVID-19)

Live Form the Morgue(COVID-19)

March 25, 2020

In this rerun of our latest live episode, we talk about movies about viruses, outbreaks, and how we are dealing with COVID-19

Friday The 13th(Live Broadcast)

Friday The 13th(Live Broadcast)

March 18, 2020

This is a replay of our Friday The 13th Live show

Prison

Prison

March 11, 2020

This week the guys talk about the movie Prison, and Carey opens a mystery box from Full Moon Entertainment 

Live From the Morgue

Live From the Morgue

March 4, 2020

This is a replay of our latest live episode 

Plank Face

Plank Face

February 19, 2020

This week the guys talk about Plank Face, Carey gives you his Tales From Tubi, and Mr. Poe goes to the movies.

Whitney Causey Benson(Red Summer Massacre)

Whitney Causey Benson(Red Summer Massacre)

February 12, 2020

This week Carey, and Mr. Poe sat down with Whitney Causey Benson to talk about her upcoming film Red Summer Massacre, Witchcraft, and modeling for BloodyGOREgeous.

Red Summer Massacre

BloodyGOREgeous Facebook

bloodygoregeous.com 

 

Midsommar

Midsommar

February 5, 2020

The guys talk about Midsommar, they also discuss the new Batman, CW's Crisis Crossover, and how Billy cheated death. 

Dave Kerr, Amber Fulcher, Michael McGlynn Interview

Dave Kerr, Amber Fulcher, Michael McGlynn Interview

January 29, 2020

This week Carey and Mr Poe sat down with Dave, Amber, and Michael to talk about their current Indiegogo campaign for the upcoming horror film Bloody Summer Camp.

 

Slasher15

Idiegogo

 

Let Sleeping Corpses Lie

Let Sleeping Corpses Lie

January 23, 2020

 This week Mr Poe and Carey struggle to get through Billy's pick with out him. They also talk about upcoming films

Bloody Summer Camp Bloody Summer Camp Indiegogo

Red Summer Massacre

Strix Strix indiegogo

Mr Poe will be attending Cult Classic Convention in Feb

The whole gang will be at Fear Fest WV in August 

 

Our new website 1313inc

Pigster

Pigster

January 8, 2020

This week the guys talk about Pigster.

Shallow Grave Plot 2 (or, ‘What year did that movie come out?)

Shallow Grave Plot 2 (or, ‘What year did that movie come out?)

December 30, 2019

Its the  New Years episode the guys cant remember when movies came out, Carey was really tired, and they created some monsters.

 

 

 

 

 

A Little Faith - Bitter Suite by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

 

Silent Night Deadly Night 2

Silent Night Deadly Night 2

December 25, 2019

In our Christmas episode It's Garbage Day!

Jack Brooks Demon Slayer

Jack Brooks Demon Slayer

December 11, 2019

This week its Jack Brooks Demon Slayer

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